exhibitions

The Seven Deadly Sins

13.03.2006 - 14.05.2006

The exhibition opened in the Holy Week of 2006 drew huge audiences to the International Cultural Centre Gallery. Jointly organised with the Scientific Library of the Polish Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Polish Academy of Sciences in Krakow, the exhibition was the fifth in a series of displays of unique prints from the collection of the Print Room. It offered an overview of iconographic images of the original sin as well as the deadly sins: Pride, Avarice, Lust, Envy, Gluttony, Wrath, and Sloth. The invention of print led to the spread and development of their iconography which resulted in sophisticated allegorical presentations. The exhibition comprised 125 prints covering the period from the end of the 15th century to the 19th century and included the copperplate engravings by Albrecht Dürer, Lucas Cranach, Pieter Bruegel the Elder, as well as impressive compositions by Peter Paul Rubens, Rembrandt van Rijn and David Teners. The highlights of the exhibition were the etchings by Rembrandt’s competitors: the French artist Jacques Callot and the Czech master Vaclav Hollar as well as the 18th century Italian and English prints, the works of William Hogarth and Richard Earlome among them.
The exhibition deserves recognition for one more reason as it reminds us of the great richness of prints from the Print Room of the Polish Academy of Arts and Sciences in Krakow. The exhibition comprises 125 works by such masters as Albrecht Dürer, Lucas Cranach, Rembrandt van Rijn or Peter Paul Rubens. Let us, then, enjoy these beautiful prints and, on the side, examine our conscience. [Piotr Sarzyński, "Polityka", April 4, 2004]

Dr. Karolina Grodziska

Doctor of historical sciences, director of the Scientific Library of the Polish Academy of Sciences and the Polish Academy of Sciences and Arts, and editor-in-chief of its yearly magazine. A researcher of Polish burial places in Poland and abroad (beneficiary of several M.B. Grabowski Scholarships). In 2004 she received the Krakow Municipality Award for works on the history of Krakow cemeteries. Author of more than 300 academic works and essays, currently working on the third volume of Polskie groby na cmentarzach Londynu.

Prints Room of the Polish Academy of Sciences and the Polish Academy of Arts and Sciences

The Print Room in the Polish Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Polish Academy of Sciences Library – one of the most valuable collection of prints in Poland whose history goes back to the 19th century. It originates in the works from the Polish Library in Paris as well as a collection by the Moszyński family. Among the collection’s highlights, one finds the prints by such celebrated artists as Martin Schongauer, Albrecht Dürer, Rembrandt van Rijn. Until today, eight exhibitions have been organised by the International Cultural Centre in cooperation with the Print Room in the Polish Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Polish Academy of Sciences Library – a testament to the years-long cooperation between the two institution. To quote from the Director of the International Cultural Centre, Prof. Jacek Purchla, the exhibitions’ aim has been “to evoke the memory of one of the most valuable collections of European art in Poland; the collection which is an important part of our national heritage. By displaying the works in the International Cultural Centre Gallery, we bring them back to our collective memory. For years, the collection localised in the heart of Krakow remained practically unknown. Due to our exhibition efforts it has finally claimed it rightful place and is widely recognised nowadays”.

Seven Deadly Sins

collective work

The catalogue accompanies another exhibition of prints from the Print Room of the Polish Academy of Arts and Sciences, in the Scientific Library of the Polish Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Polish Academy of Sciences in Krakow. The basic text by K. Krużel, the exhibition's author and curator, can be considered an extraordinary guidebook illustrated with relevant fragments of the prints and even their details, which leads the reader through the labyrinth of subjects, plots and iconographic shapes recorded on the prints. The publication closes with a list of exhibited prints complete with the didactic inscriptions preserved in order to mirror the originals which often used to be affixed to the representations of the sins.

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